Steak tartare with melba toast and watercress

Chef Florent Chollet of Cav's Resturant

This Hereford steak dish is "tartare au couteau " which means prepared with a knife. It is the simplest of recipes but its success relies on excellent ingredients. The Espelette pepper is grown in the French commune of Espetette, Pyrenees-Atlantiques, traditionally the northern territory of the Basque people. However if unavailable it can be replaced with black pepper.

This Hereford steak dish is “tartare au couteau ” which means prepared with a knife. It is the simplest of recipes but its success relies on excellent ingredients. The Espelette pepper is grown in the French commune of Espetette, Pyrenees-Atlantiques, traditionally the northern territory of the Basque people. However if unavailable it can be replaced with black pepper.

Serves: 4

Cooking Time:

INGREDIENTS

for the Steak tartare

for the dressing

METHOD

  1. Using a very sharp knife, finely chop the shallots and capers. Dice the beef and then mix in the shallots and capers. Set aside at room temperature.

  2. To make the dressing, whisk all of the ingredients together and using a rubber spatula, mix 150ml of it into the beef mixture with the sea salt and Espelette pepper.

  3. Place a cooking ring on each serving plate and divide the beef mixture among them.

  4. Put the egg yolks in a heatproof bowl set over a pan of simmering water that is approximately 60 degrees with 100ml of the dressing and lightly whisk to an emulsion.

  5. Make a light hollow in the centre of each steak tartare and then carefully spoon in the egg yolk emulsion. Add some Melba toast and watercress to each plate to serve.

Discover More Recipes

Print Friendly, PDF & EmailPrint

Tom Barry

Tom Barry’s family farm is Baytown Park, Dunboyne, Co Meath. He is the third generation on the farm taking over from his late father, Thomas Barry in 2008 and keeps Hereford cross suckler cows as well as pedigree Hereford cows. Herefords are such a docile breed and as a part time farmer, with teenagers helping around the farm, it’s important to have a breed that’s easy to look after and handle. Tom’s farm is in the Green, Low-Carbon, Agri-Environment Scheme (GLAS) for the past 5 years, where frequently taking soil samples and the completion of a nutrient management plan are required.

Consumers choose excellence

Surveys confirm that customers prefer beef from grass-fed cattle and are willing to pay more for it. With its flavour, tenderness and consistency, Certified Irish Hereford Prime delivers an eating experience that turns any meal into a truly memorable event.

Intro