Hereford Prime Côte de Bœuf smoked with herbs de Provence

Chef Eric Léautey of A Table Chez Eric Léautey

A popular cut of beef in France, a côte de bœuf (literally, "beef rib") is better known as a rib of beef on the bone in Ireland and England. It is undeniably one of the most tempting cuts of beef you can get. Make sure it has been well aged and always allow it to come back up to room temperature before using it.

A popular cut of beef in France, a côte de bœuf (literally, “beef rib”) is better known as a rib of beef on the bone in Ireland and England. It is undeniably one of the most tempting cuts of beef you can get. Make sure it has been well aged and always allow it to come back up to room temperature before using it.

Serves: 2

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

  1. Take out the meat out of the fridge 1 hour before cooking and give it a good wipe with kitchen paper to remove any excess moisture.

  2. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F/Gas mark 4). Heat a large heavy-based ovenproof frying pan that is large enough to take the piece of beef comfortably with the oil and butter. Season the meat with salt and pepper and add to the pan. Cook for at least 5-6 minutes on one side until nicely seared and then turn over and add the garlic cloves, then cook for another few minutes until browned.

  3. Transfer to the oven and cook for another 10 minutes until just cooked through but still rare in the middle. If you prefer your meat more well done cook it for a little longer.

  4. Remove from the oven and cover loosely with tin foil and leave to rest for 10 minutes, then surround with the dried herbs and set the herbs alight. Quickly cover the whole dish with a metal dome (or another pot) so that the flames immediately go out and leave for another 5 minutes to allow the flavours to infuse.

  5. Carve the beef on a platter and serve on warmed serving plates with the sautéed potatoes & onions with mushrooms.

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Tom Barry

Tom Barry’s family farm is Baytown Park, Dunboyne, Co Meath. He is the third generation on the farm taking over from his late father, Thomas Barry in 2008 and keeps Hereford cross suckler cows as well as pedigree Hereford cows. Herefords are such a docile breed and as a part time farmer, with teenagers helping around the farm, it’s important to have a breed that’s easy to look after and handle. Tom’s farm is in the Green, Low-Carbon, Agri-Environment Scheme (GLAS) for the past 5 years, where frequently taking soil samples and the completion of a nutrient management plan are required.

Consumers choose excellence

Surveys confirm that customers prefer beef from grass-fed cattle and are willing to pay more for it. With its flavour, tenderness and consistency, Certified Irish Hereford Prime delivers an eating experience that turns any meal into a truly memorable event.

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